Academic Catalog

Homeland Security (HLS)

HLS 300E  Admin Homeland Security  (4 Credits)  

This course examines the administration of homeland security. Students will review the formation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) from pre-existing agencies and evaluate how this impacts both the functions and the functioning of DHS. Students will investigate the responsibilities of various federal, state and local political entities and compare the role of domestic law enforcement vs. the role of the military. The course will also introduce the determination of potential terrorist targets, examine the differences between actual and symbolic targets of terrorism, discuss financing the war on terror, and explore the administration and cost of the response to natural disasters. Offered as needed.

Department: Social Sciences  
Pre-Requisites: None  
Co-Requisites: None  
Fees: None  
HLS 301E  Homeland Security: Issues and Impact  (4 Credits)  

The course presents, examines, and discusses practical issues related to Homeland Security including domestic and international travel, immigration and civil rights, international relations, and consequences of the recent war on terror, especially the resultant political extremism. Students will examine Homeland Security failures and successes by both domestic and foreign governments, evaluate means to correct the failures, and propose methods to capitalize on the successes. In addition, students will explore the impact of Homeland Security on the average citizen and the impact of Homeland Security on commerce. Offered as needed.

Department: Social Sciences  
Pre-Requisites: GEN 300X or 310E and HLS 300E and GEN 300E.  
Co-Requisites: None  
Fees: None  
HLS 375E  Princ of Emergency Mgmt  (4 Credits)  

This course introduces the principles of emergency management, including an understanding of how to perform a local hazard assessment for an organization or community, the development of a response plan, and an introduction to the management of large-scale incidents. The course will introduce the concept of disaster recovery for organizations and communities and the parallel concept of disaster recovery as it concerns information technology. Instruction will address the role of first responders to an incident, financing issues for emergency management, and the process of securing grants from the United States Department of Homeland Security. Offered as needed.

Department: Social Sciences  
Pre-Requisites: None  
Co-Requisites: None  
Fees: None  
HLS 402E  Managing Natural Disasters  (4 Credits)  

This course examines the management of natural (non-manmade) disasters such as intense storms, hurricanes, tornados, floods, earthquakes, fires, drought, diseases, or epidemics. The course will discuss principles of prior strategic planning for a large incident, including preparation of emergency operation plans, the role of incident command, the role of planning during an incident, resource management, reentry, and cleanup. The specific emergency management demands, and challenges of each disaster will be reviewed through the use of case studies. Offered as needed.

Department: Social Sciences  
Pre-Requisites: None  
Co-Requisites: None  
Fees: None  
HLS 403E  Managing Manmade Disasters  (4 Credits)  

This course examines the management of manmade (and terrorist) disasters such as chemical, biological, or radiological spills; the deployment of weapons of mass destruction; a nuclear radiation release; or transportation catastrophe. Building upon the last course, students will apply the principles of prior strategic planning for a large incident, emergency operation plans, incident command, disaster response planning, and resource management. Specific emergency management demands, and challenges will be reviewed through the use of case studies. Offered as needed.

Department: Social Sciences  
Pre-Requisites: None  
Co-Requisites: None  
Fees: None  
HLS 475E  Capstone in Homeland Security  (4 Credits)  

This capstone course integrates the knowledge and skills learned in the previous courses, asking students to demonstrate integrative thinking and the ability to transfer theoretical knowledge from one setting to another. Using simulations and case studies, individuals and groups will apply theory to real situations, analyze data, employ appropriate problem solving, demonstrate effective planning, and function effectively as a team. Each group will develop an emergency disaster plan for a specific community and event, as well as analyze its effectiveness as a team. Each student will evaluate the student’s own growth and development in a series of reflective essays and problem-solving responses. Offered as needed.

Department: Social Sciences  
Pre-Requisites: None  
Co-Requisites: None  
Fees: 60  
HLS 501E  Professional Seminar In Homeland Security  (3 Credits)  

This course examines the primary elements of Homeland Security studies including the history and administration of Homeland Security in the United States, an introduction to Homeland Security law and policy, an introduction to terrorism, and an introduction to emergency management. This course introduces the concept of the rule of law in defending the homeland, and important concepts in the study of terrorism including a brief historical examination of terrorism. The course discusses the difference between terrorist acts and ordinary criminal activity. The course examines the ways in which the United States interacts with the world community economically, politically, and socially in relation to Homeland Security issues. In addition, the course introduces the principles of emergency management, and introduces the process for management of large-scale incidents.

Department: Social Sciences  
Pre-Requisites: None  
Co-Requisites: None  
Fees: 65  
HLS 503E  U.S. National Strategy For Homeland Security  (3 Credits)  

This course examines the concept of U.S. National Strategy for Homeland Security in the context of recent history by identifying and analyzing US Homeland Security strategy as codified by the Homeland Security Presidential Directives, and the past and current U.S. Department of Homeland Security Strategic Plans. In general, the U.S. National Strategy for Homeland Security seeks to deter and prevent terrorist attacks; secure and manage U.S. borders; enforce and administer U.S. immigration laws; protect cyber networks; protect critical infrastructure; and enable mitigation and recovery from disasters. The course describes the evolution of institutional and organizational relationships that are emerging to accomplish the various National-Strategy-for-Homeland-Security missions and functions. This course introduces the current U.S. National Security Strategy and examines the many issues and factors involved in national security policymaking. The course compares and contrasts U.S. National Security Strategy and the U.S. National Strategy for Homeland Security. The course analyzes the compromises that are necessary when policy decisions involve differing political, social, economic, military, and ethical goals.

Department: Social Sciences  
Pre-Requisites: None  
Co-Requisites: None  
Fees: None  
HLS 575E  Contemporary Leadership And Ethical Issues In Homeland Security  (3 Credits)  

This course provides students with an examination of organizational codes of conduct, ethical decision-making, ethical leadership, and moral courage. It examines ethical issues regarding the application of Homeland Security law and the challenges associated therein regarding the protection of individual civil rights. The course explores the history of ethical conduct in the rule of law and analyzes the use of governmental leadership and legislation as part of the response to threats to Homeland Security. The course analyzes the treatment of captured terrorists and the ethical and legal issues involved. It examines the theories, roles, and practices of leadership, focusing on the issues facing government officials in Homeland Security. The course analyzes the past performance of leaders involved in Homeland Security-related critical incidents and analyzes the impact government officials’ leadership styles have on the resolution and management of significant issues. The course compares and contrasts the differences between various definitions of management and leadership.

Department: Social Sciences  
Pre-Requisites: None  
Co-Requisites: None  
Fees: None  
HLS 595E  Intelligence and Homeland Security  (3 Credits)  

This course examines the structure, roles, and interactions of foreign and domestic intelligence communities, the intelligence gathering and analysis capabilities of the criminal justice and private sector entities, and covert and counterintelligence operations. It includes a survey of the field of intelligence. Emphasis is placed on the collection, analysis, and review of the function, principles, and methods of intelligence collection. The course evaluates the use of intelligence in the Homeland Security arena and the range of resources that are necessary to carry out intelligence operations. Central to the course is the understanding of intelligence as it relates to its use in law enforcement and homeland security.

Department: Social Sciences  
Pre-Requisites: None  
Co-Requisites: None  
Fees: None  
HLS 611E  Domestic Terrorism, Radicalization, and Extremist Groups  (3 Credits)  

This course examines the origins of terrorism within the United States. It provides a foundation for constructing a definition and explanation of the tactics and behaviors of domestic terrorists. The course classifies terrorism within the area of criminal justice by exploring the definition and differences between terrorist- and non-terrorist related criminal acts. The course analyzes different types of domestic terrorism including eco-terrorism, militias, racial violence and anti-abortion violence. The course identifies, evaluates and analyzes the concept and practice of violent radicalization and recruitment into terrorism. Models, circumstances, processes, and behaviors underlying the reasons how and why people become radicalized and join terrorist groups are explored. The course identifies and analyzes policies and approaches aimed at countering this radicalization. Methods that can be used to help people de-radicalize and disengage from terrorist activities are discussed. The course develops a definition of “lone-wolf” terrorism and analyzes the recent state of lone wolf attacks throughout the US and the rest of the world.

Department: Social Sciences  
Pre-Requisites: None  
Co-Requisites: None  
Fees: None  
HLS 613E  Cyber Crime and Cyber Terrorism  (3 Credits)  

The exponential power and influence of emerging technologies provides unprecedented access to people and commodities worldwide. In exchange for the convenience of sophisticated hardware and software applications, users forego any expectation of privacy or anonymity, and unwittingly subject themselves to potential exploitation by cyber criminals and cyber terrorists. This course examines the history and evolving nature of cybercrime and cyber terrorism. It compares and contrasts the relationship between cybercrime and cyber terrorism and discusses the differences between hacking and cybercrime. The course identifies and explains the relationships and differences between criminal hacking and state-sponsored hacking. It explores the concepts of data theft, intellectual property theft, and identity theft. The course introduces the tools and methods used to exploit computer networks and strategies used to protect against them.

Department: Social Sciences  
Pre-Requisites: None  
Co-Requisites: None  
Fees: None  
HLS 621E  Border and Port Security  (3 Credits)  

This course introduces and analyzes key U.S. border security issues. It identifies the policies established by U.S. Homeland Security agencies used to maintain border security. The course analyzes and discusses specific border-related issues including the effect that U.S. immigration policy has on border security and issues related specifically to trains, trucks, pipelines, ships, and the smuggling of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The course examines the technology needed to detect and deter terrorists and WMD. Emphasis is placed on human, drug, and arms trafficking along the U.S.-Mexico border, as well as comparative examples from border regions around the world. The course discusses the role of drug cartels, criminal gangs, and corruption as related to border security. The course examines issues at the U.S.-Canadian border, U.S.-Mexican border, and maritime Ports of Entry.

Department: Social Sciences  
Pre-Requisites: None  
Co-Requisites: None  
Fees: None  
HLS 622E  Airport and Aviation Security  (3 Credits)  

This course examines United States Homeland Security airport and aviation security. The course examines historical U.S. airport and aviation security and compares and contrasts those policies to US airport and aviation security policies since 9/11. It evaluates and analyzes threats to airport and aviation security posed by terrorists. The course identifies potential vulnerabilities to airport and aviation security and discusses alternatives to U.S. and Department of Homeland Security policies and procedures. The course explores the formation of the Transportation Security Agency (TSA) and discusses and analyzes its efficacy. It compares and contrasts US airport and aviation security with that of other nations. It examines the legal implications of TSA and Department of Homeland Security policies and procedures on civil rights and civil liberties. The course explores the role of technology in airport and aviation security and compares and contrasts technological innovations with manual and verbal methods. The course explores the physical and legislative differences between airport and aviation security and border security.

Department: Social Sciences  
Pre-Requisites: None  
Co-Requisites: None  
Fees: None  
HLS 631E  Critical Infrastructure and Emergency Management  (3 Credits)  

This course provides students with an introduction to the concept of critical infrastructure and the prevention, mitigation and recovery from disasters involving critical infrastructure. The course defines critical infrastructure and examine methods for prioritization and protection of critical infrastructure. It identifies specific examples of critical infrastructure including information technology, telecommunications, chemical, transportation, food, energy, water, public health, and emergency services. The course analyzes the threats to those specific examples and explores methods and procedures that can be used to protect them and aid them in disaster recovery. It investigates problems and solutions relating to the tactics for defending critical infrastructures. It examines the physiological and psychological aspects of disaster management and presents the effect those disasters and other traumatic events can have on the individuals, organizations and communities involved. Finally, the course examines critical incident stress management, prevention and mitigation strategies and protocols that can be used in the workplace and community.

Department: Social Sciences  
Pre-Requisites: None  
Co-Requisites: None  
Fees: None  
HLS 651E  Capstone Course In Homeland Security  (3 Credits)  

The Capstone Course in Homeland Security provides a summary experience at the conclusion of all courses in the degree path. The course examines contemporary Homeland Security issues beginning with an analysis of current Presidential and Department of Homeland Security policies and continues with an evaluation of the operational and tactical activities of the Department of Homeland Security. The course provides a self-reflection on studies within the disciplines of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness. The course is a culminating study and research experience designed to develop competencies in problem identification; conducting, using, and interpreting research for analysis; and professional writing skills. This course requires an independent, original research paper on an issue of the student’s choice.

Department: Social Sciences  
Pre-Requisites: None  
Co-Requisites: None  
Fees: None