Academic Catalog

International Studies, B.A.

Program Description

Today’s increasingly competitive job market and graduate programs seek college graduates who can effectively integrate knowledge across a range of disciplines and use such insights to articulate pragmatic solutions to complex local and global challenges. The International Studies major – housed in the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies – addresses this need by combining rigorous academic training with practical strategies for effective community engagement. This course of study offers its students a cross-cultural and trans historical perspective on the human condition, thereby providing them with the tools to engage with an interconnected and rapidly changing world. Students select from two of four possible concentrations that will prepare them for careers in business, law, government, and the humanities. An emphasis on community-based and experiential learning encourages students to consider their roles and responsibilities as citizens in a pluralistic democracy, helping to build a more just and sustainable future. Students are encouraged to study abroad to give them an opportunity to experience a foreign country.

Program Goals

  • To enrich students’ understanding of the interconnectedness of peoples and cultures
  • To expose students to cultural traditions and practices outside their world view
  • To develop students’ awareness of cultural diversity so that they can communicate with reflection, empathy, and intelligence
  • To prepare students to participate in a global dialogue
  • To familiarize students with different disciplinary approaches to the international world
  • To increase students’ abilities to read closely and to make informed critical judgments
  • To develop students’ abilities to communicate clearly and persuasively, orally, in writing, and in multimedia
  • To prepare students for careers in government, law, international business, cultural institutions, organizations servicing international concerns, education, writing, and other fields that require global awareness, cultural sensitivity, and intellectual discernment

Degree earned: B.A.
Total number of credits: 120-125

Credit Distribution

General Education Core
Writing Courses
ENG 110College Writing3
or ENG 112 College Writing for Multilingual Students
ENG/HON 200Advanced College Writing3
or ENG 202 Advanced College Writing for Multilingual Students
Critical Dialogues Course
INT 110Introduction to Dialogues in Critical Thinking 13
American Dialogues Course
Select one course of the following:3
Photographers, Writers, and the American Scene
Social Issues in Policing a Multicultural Community
Justice and Democracy in America
African-American History
Cultural Interaction in Colonial North America
Enduring American Dialogues
Creative and Reflective Dialogues Course
Select one course of the following:3
Contemporary Photography as Cultural Landscape
Beginning Drawing
Basic Photography: Criticizing Photography
Introduction to Creative Writing
Creative Nonfiction Writing
Creative Expression
Introduction to Theatre and Performance
Sustainability Dialogues Course
Select one course of the following:3-4
Introductory Biology
Human Nutrition
Botany
Enviromental Studies
Introductory Chemistry
Scientific Discovery
Physical Science
Principles of Physics I
Global Dialogues Course
Select one course of the following:3
British Literature I: Middle Ages to the 18th Century
British Literature II: Late 18th Century to The Present
Themes and Topics in World Literature & Culture
Major Global Literary Figures
Baccalaureate Capstone I
Medieval World
The History of Ireland
History of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
The Arts in Society
Psychoanalysis & Politics
Seminar in Religion and Belief
Classical Music Studies
Truth & Justice
Citizenship Dialogues Course
Select one course of the following:3
Baccalaureate Capstone II
Capstone in Citizenship
Psychology Capstone
MAT 114Intermediate Algebra 23
MAT 201Statistics and Society3
SPE 130Fundamentals of Public Speaking3
Major Requirements
Major Core credits includes six credits of a Foreign Language.
HIS 101World Cultures3
INT 150Introduction to International Studies3
INT 325Intercultural Communication3
ENG 215Survey of World Literature3
Foreign Language I3
Foreign Language II3
Liberal Arts and Sciences Courses
APY 100Introduction to Anthropology3
PHI 300Ethics3
SOC 100Introduction to Sociology3
POL 100Introduction To Political Science3
Experiential Learning
INT 377International Studies Field Experience I3
INT 477International Studies Field Experience II3
Concentrations
Select two of the following Concentrations:30-34
Free Electives
Select 21 credits of Free Electives 321
Total Hours120-125
1

Required of first-year students; all other students may substitute a 300/400 level Liberal Arts and Sciences elective

2

Or above, as determined by placement test. Students who meet the math competency may substitute a Liberal Arts & Sciences elective

3

May include any college course. Students are highly encouraged to use some of their free elective credits for study abroad.

Concentrations

Intercultural Studies Concentration (Concentration I)

Select one courses of the following:3
Art History I: Ancient Through Medieval
Art History II: Renaissance Through Modern
The History of Photography
Select four courses of the following:12
British Literature I: Middle Ages to the 18th Century
Multicultural Literature of the United States
Themes and Topics in World Literature & Culture
Major Global Literary Figures
Cultural Geography
History of Ethnic America
HIS 320
The History of Ireland
The Arts in Society
Seminar in Religion and Belief
Classical Music Studies
Total Hours15

International Business Concentration (Concentration II)

Select five courses of the following:15
Business and Professional Writing
Business Law I
International Business Strategy
Diversity in Organizations
Macroeconomics
Global Leadership
Total Hours15

International Law Concentration (Concentration III)

Select five courses of the following:17
Select one course of the following:
Introduction to Criminal Law
Constitutional Issues in Criminal Justice
American Popular Culture
Logic
Truth & Justice
Select one course of the following:
Argumentation & Persuasion
Advanced Report and Proposal Writing
Legal Writing
Select one course of the following:
Early United States History
Contemporary United States History
History of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
Required
HLS 300
HLS 301
Total Hours17

Urban Studies Concentration (Concentration IV)

Select five courses of the following:15
Photography And Perception: A Way Of Seeing
Urban Anthropology
Social Issues in Policing a Multicultural Community
Cultural Geography
Urban History
The History of Buffalo
The American City
Total Hours15

Suggested Sequence

Plan of Study Grid
First Year
First SemesterHours
INT 110 Introduction to Dialogues in Critical Thinking 3
ENG 110 College Writing 3
MAT 114 Intermediate Algebra 3
SPE 130 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3
SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology 3
 Hours15
Second Semester
American Dialogues 3
ENG 200 Advanced College Writing 3
MAT 201 Statistics and Society 3
INT 150 Introduction to International Studies 3
POL 100 Introduction To Political Science 3
 Hours15
Second Year
First Semester
Creative Dialogues 3
APY 100 Introduction to Anthropology 3
For. Lang. 3
Concentration 1 3
Concentration 2 3
 Hours15
Second Semester
Sustainability Dialogues 3
For. Lang. 3
ENG 215 Survey of World Literature 3
Concentration 1 3
Concentration 2 3
 Hours15
Third Year
First Semester
PHI 300 Ethics 3
INT 325 Intercultural Communication 3
Concentration 1 3
Concentration 2 3
Free Elective 3
 Hours15
Second Semester
Global Dialogues 3
HIS 101 World Cultures 3
INT 377 International Studies Field Experience I 3
Free Elective 3
Free Elective 3
 Hours15
Fourth Year
First Semester
INT 450 Capstone in Citizenship 3
Free Elective 3
INT 477 International Studies Field Experience II 3
Concentration 1 3
Concentration 2 3
 Hours15
Second Semester
Free Elective 3
Free Elective 3
Free Elective 3
Concentration 1 3
Concentration 2 3
 Hours15
 Total Hours120

Please Note: The above shows the ideal suggested sequencing and scheduling of courses and credits by semester. It is based on eight semesters for a traditionally-structured baccalaureate degree. Degree program requirements and the scheduling of courses are subject to change, based on writing/math placements and course availability. This chart should be utilized a guide and is not a written contract. Students will be notified of changes that may affect their academic progress.